Tag Archives: The Green Blog Network

Local Governments For Sustainability World Congress

(posted from press release)

Climate-KIC will be present at the Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI) World Congress on 8 April in Seoul, Republic of Korea, to officially launch the Low Carbon City Lab programme and discuss new partnerships with cities and organisations from around the world.

Greenhouse gas emissions in cities originate from a host of different sources, such as electricity production, transportation, commercial and residential buildings, as well as industry and waste. Reducing urban emissions is a shared effort by a large panel of city stakeholders.
The new programme is part of a range of Climate-KIC programmes designed to help cities reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create new jobs for their low carbon economies. Climate-KIC is the European Union’s main climate innovation initiative and supported by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT).

Low Carbon City Lab 

Cities account for 70 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activities

PARIS, FRANCE, 31 March 2015 – With all eyes on a global deal to reduce greenhouse gasses at the UN’s COP21 conference in Paris later this year, EU initiative Climate-KIC will launch a new programme to help cities around the world unlock their emission reduction potential at a major global event in Seoul on 8 April 2015.

Cities account for 70 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activities. According to the United Nations agency for human settlements and sustainable urban development, 75 per cent of the world population will be living in urban environments by 2050. The annual increase of the total world population is 1 per cent, while in the urban areas it is 1.8 per cent, almost twice as much.  Cities will continue to be the key nexus for climate action for years to come.

Leveraging a diverse grouping of companies, research centers, technology experts, city networks and cities, Climate-KIC’s new Low Carbon City Lab programme will aim to unlock the greenhouse gas emission reduction potential of cities, and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 1 gigatonne per year.

 

Green Blog Network * Greening Hollywood * Greening Beauty 

Greening Paris * Greening Vancouver

Strategies to reduce urban greenhouse gas emissions 

Thanh-Tam Lê, Director of Climate-KIC’s centre in France, said “Our Low Carbon City Lab is an exciting example of how public-private partnerships can tackle climate change through both a market-led and an impact driven approach.”

The programme provides a series of tools, consulting and services to develop urban climate mitigation strategies:

  • 3D software to visualise greenhouse gas emissions in cities. We also help cities bring together the data from sources across their urban areas.
  • Experts to verify greenhouse gas inventories according to the recently launched Greenhouse Gas Protocol standard and to prioritise actions.
  • Help to boost cities’ business generation activities including support for start-ups
  • Tools enabling the monitoring of emissions from the transport sector.
  • Services including training and summer schools, with courses focusing on climate finance for cities and the latest developments in greenhouse gas monitoring approaches for cities.
  • Contribution to the definition of climate finance frameworks for cities (NAMAs, VNAMAs)
Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under climate chane, Green Blog Network, Green Cities, Greening Vancouver, Paige Donner, sustainable cities, Sustainable Design

Olympic Echoes

Echoes of the 2010 Winter Olympics are all around. A mere 48 hours after Canada won the definitive hockey game in overtime, and the streets are filled with poignant echoes of these past two weeks of historical moments, indelible memories.

Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics

And how incredible those moments were, these memories are.

As people scrambled onto their trains, planes and buses this past day and a half, Vancouver has been left empty. Canada Hockey Place echoes with the glory of games won, victories lost; the Olympic Athletic Village is now bereft of its glorious inhabitants;  BC Place echoes with the emptiness of the silence left after the golden podium moments, the Neil YoungLong May You Run,” sung lyrics.

Scott Moir and Tessa Virtue

The echoes, the emptiness are a dramatic reminder that people, energy, living organisms and the essence of being alive are what animate our Earth.

And isn’t that what is at the heart of this whole discussion of the “greenest Olympic games in history.” An urban landscape, without people, people who are alive, energetic and dynamic, is simply a lonely concrete urban landscape.

Men’s Short Track Relay

To come together and celebrate the glory of a select few athletes who have trained hard to be at the pinnacle of human athletic excellence is the Olympics. It’s as much the Olympics as the competitions themselves.

To leave a lasting legacy, a healthy planet, for these young athletes and their progeny, and all of the rest of us who currently call planet Earth home, is what is at the heart of this whole carbon neutral conversation, this ongoing dialogue about Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

Shaun White
St. Gelais

Whether the Vancouver 2010 Olympic games were the greenest in history is not what is the most important criteria by which to judge. What the most important criteria by which to judge is that there was significant attention placed on the importance of Greening the Olympics.  And the threads of green were evidenced throughout the games, like an intricate brocade of spun gold, in this case, spun green.

Julia Mancuso and Lindsey Vonn

Three billion people worldwide watched the Winter Olympics. Hundreds of thousands walked the streets of Vancouver where no matter where you looked you saw recyclable trash cans, alternative energy showcases, streamlined public transportation, carbon offset programs…and pedestrians. Visitors to the Olympics no doubt learned a lot about Vancouver, and also couldn’t avoid learning about environmental practices while they were there.

Jasey Jay Anderson

The power of sporting events to galvanize people, to galvanize nations was once again on display.

On the fuel-cell powered shuttle bus ride back from the NRC fuel cell research center, I was engaged in a friendly discussion with a fellow journalist from Reuters. “Are the games really the greenest?” she asked me.  My response to her, and now, is that it depends on where you focus and it depends on your mindset.  Sure, a Zamboni or two may have malfunctioned on the ice a couple of times, but where else has it been achieved to focus 3 billion people’s attention on the issue of environmentally friendlier ways of throwing sporting events where the whole world comes to celebrate?

Women’s Curling Team, Canada
Simon Ammann, Swiss, Photo by Dmitry Lovetsky, AssociatedPress

We will leave you with one last thought.  Bio Plastic Ski Boots.

Atomic Ski Boots Made From Bio Plastics

Hnh?  Yes, although plastics are simply, for the most part, solidified oil, DuPont has come up with a Bio Plastic called Hytrel® RS. It  contains 35% to 65% renewably sourced material. The plastic is made with carbon captured from coal-factory smokestacks, some plastics can be made from 55% captured carbon; the goal is 100%.

Atomic Ski Boots manufactures the ski boots. The newest boots in the line are the Renu 110 and Renu 90. They are billed as the first carbon negative planet positive product in the ski boot world. They use a style of plastic called Pebax Renew Bio Plastic. Atomic says all components of the boots are reusable and recyclable.

The Green Blog NetworkGreening Hollywood

Posted via web from The Green Blog Network

Leave a comment

Filed under 2010 Olympics, BC Clean Energy, Biodiversity, Carbon Neutral, Green Blog Network, Green House Gas Emissions, Greening Hollywood, Greening Vancouver

Ice Matters

Winter Olympics 2010, The Green Games

Up in Canada where ice is integral to lifestyle and where, during these 2010 Winter Olympics, it’s all about ice – ice hockey, ice skating, curling, luge, skeleton, skiing, bobsleigh … ice…ice…snow and more ice…Ice really matters.

But there’s a whole other reason why ice matters and matters in a big way. And that’s because ice is melting.

James Balog, Artist, Scientist, Explorer and Adventurer has produced his Extreme Ice Survey, a compelling time-lapse photographic presentation depicting the world’s ice melting at a speed heretofore unimagined. Balog is Olympic 2010 sponsor, Samsung Corporation’s, Eco-Ambassador.

James Balog Presents Extreme Ice Survey at Samsung Rendezvous to Vancouver School Children, Winter Games 2010

On February 16th, Canada’s Federal Government Minister of Environment, Jim Prentice [Twitter @JimPrentice] announced that they would offset the estimated 7,600 tons of GHG emissions created by the thousands of government employees participating/volunteering in the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter games.

“Canada is proud to be the first host country in history to help offset the greenhouse gas emissions of its Olympic Games,” said Minister Prentice. “This commitment is one of many ways our Government is contributing to sustainable Games and meeting our global climate change responsibilities.”

And while we all know, somewhere in our brains, that these numbers are significant and meaningful, it’s the visuals that really sink in.

And here’s where James Balog, a world-renowned nature photographer, can communicate the urgent nature of the state of our affairs so graphically. With his Extreme Ice Survey.

“Ice is the canary in the coal mine,” said Balog in his TED Global talk delivered in Oxford, England a few months ago.  More recently at Vancouver’s Live City he explained, “We are able to communicate the reality of Climate Change through our Extreme Ice Survey (.org) time-lapse photography essays.”

“We are encouraging government leaders to allow us to bring out the story of what the cameras are seeing,” noted Balog.

Balog has shown his Extreme Ice Survey to audiences as varied as sophisticated scientific minds at NASA to academics at Oxford to…kids from Vancouver’s Mackenzie Elementary School (pictured above in their February 23rd Eco Classroom led by Balog).

“When people see my photography of landscapes melting, they understand it immediately. From the time you are one-years-old, everyone understands melting ice. From the moment you feel an ice cube melt on your tongue, you understand the concept that warmth melts ice,” explains Balog.

Why does the melting of glaciers matter? Because they offer a tangible, visible manifestation of a dramatic change in climate that’s underway.

It’s a worldwide change; Glaciers are the visible manifestation.

Photographic documentation also provided undeniable evidence for these claims. Evidence that flies in the face of the Climate Deniers.

“Climate Gate was a ridiculously absurd and overblown event. It was a campaign of confusion and misinformation. The Climate Change deniers stepped up their game right before the Copenhagen Conference,” said Balog.

“Scientists are not wild-eyed radicals. They are everything but. History is going to judge the Climate Deniers as irresponsible, criminal even.”

“There are people who say that Obama is selling off the future of the U.S. with his big spending campaign. Climate Change Deniers are selling off the the future of our Earth’s resources,” says Balog. “You can liken the campaign of today’s Climate Change Deniers with the cigarette companies of a couple decades ago. The more the status quo makes money in their status quo industries, the more they want to preserve the status quo.”

Even giants such as Microsoft’s Bill Gates has gotten on board with the cause of climate change. At lat week’s TED conference in Long Beach, California, he said that climate change is the world’s “most vexing problem,” and expounded on the need to find a cheap and clean energy source, saying it is even more important than creating new vaccines and improving farming techniques.

For artist-adventurer James Balog, with the backing of a global electronics leader such as Samsung, he now has the means to spread his message wide and far.  His EIS has already been the subject of  a Nova/PBS TV special and a new book, Extreme Ice Now.

Balog on Photography:

We’ve been finding that visuals presented properly can captivate people in a way that the qualitative cannot. Visuals makes it real.

Eyes are the primary organ of human perception.

Numbers are an abstraction. Numbers must be processed by the brain and then interpreted. Only a small percentage of the population really speak the language of numbers easily.

Everyone gets the eye/visual thing.

Balog says that  British Columbia is one of the world’s regions on the front lines of climate change.  A private foundation recently funded a reconaissance aerial tour to observe the area between between Mt. Garibaldi and Mt. Waddington.  He admitted that he was “stunned” to discover the amount of glacial retreat there was.  He said he had never seen such dramatic change in landscape. “I have seen a lot of changing mountains but I have not seen such a change like this,” said Balog.

With his Extreme Ice Survey organization, James Balog monitors other key areas of the globe:  “We have time-lapse cameras posted in the Andes, Alps, Iceland,Greenland, N. Rockies U.S., and Alaska.”

Canada’s Minister of Environment Prentice said, “In addition to promoting sustainability at the Games, these innovative approaches will also showcase Canadian environmental technology and ingenuity to the world.”

More of VANOC’s [Vancouver Olympic Committee] and Canada’s Olympic environmental initiatives:

  • Environmental assessments of Olymipic venue sites to reduce the ecological footprint of the Games;
  • The Canada Line representing 19 kilometers rail transit system that links downtown Vancouver with central Richmond and the Vancouver International Airport funded under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Program;
  • The BC Hydrogen Highway project showcasing hydrogen and fuel-cell technology including fuel-cell vehicles and fuelling stations, and;
  • The wave roof of the Richmond Oval made from recycled wood from trees destroyed by pine beetles.

Read More Here

Greening Vancouver * Green Blog Network * Greening Hollywood

The Green Blog Network * Greening Vancouver

Green Blog Network Sponsored in part by:

Item  Thumbnail

Leave a comment

Filed under 2010 Olympics, BC Clean Energy, Biodiversity, Carbon Neutral, Environment Canada, Green Blog Network, Green Cities, Green House Gas Emissions, Greening Vancouver, Sustainable Design

Olympics 2010 – Premier Campbell Swoops In To Take Green

Looking something akin to an Olympian Superhero, Premier Gordon Campbell kicked off this pre-Olympic Weekend by flying over Robson Square, not quite in a cape but certainly the next best thing…on the zip line at Robson Square.

“The harness was quite comfortable,” he said afterwards.He and Olympian Charmaine Crooks were the first to ride the Zip Line and launched what will be free rides offered starting Feb. 12th, the first official day of the Winter Games.  The ride speeds revellers off a four-storey-high tower and along a 170 meter wire.

[premier-gordon-campbell-rides-robson-zipline-06.jpg]

Photo Courtesy VanCityBuzz

“That was great. I was trying to do a somersault backwards and I didn’t quite make it,” yelled the super-fly Premier Campbell to reporters watching below. “This is going to be a fun place for people to come,” he said. “I want everyone to know it’s there for them, it’s free for them, it’s their Olympics, so come down and have a good time.”

<<More Here>>

Campbell was out and about promoting all things green that VANOC (Vancouver Olympic Committee) and the Province of B.C. has done to make these games green.

FACT: The 2010 Winter Games will produce only about a tenth of the carbon dioxide emissions generated by previous Winter Games. The games will be run primarily on clean renewable hydro electricity provided by BC Hydro.  For a complete rundown on how the timing devices and broadcasters et al will be powered by Clean Energy go to the Power Smart Village site.

The 2010 Winter Games will produce the lowest carbon dioxide emissions from power generation in the history of the modern Games, at only about a tenth of previous Winter Games.

https://i1.wp.com/www.gordoncampbellmla.bc.ca/media/resampled_PGC_Miga_Feb08_560.jpg

Club Energy is one of the Fun things offered at the Power Smart Village.  The dance floor actually lights up as you dance, powered by your energy. And it’s sustainable.  No bouncers, no cover charge.  They challenge you to prove you really can “Light up a room!”

For Sustaianability and the Winter Games, the Power Smart Village is Renewable Energy Central for the 2010 Winter Games. It thrives on people power. It’s a free, interactive gathering place in downtown Vancouver. It promises to “deliver fun and insight into living greener in B.C.” And, well, why not the World!

On February 10th, they’re hosting a So You Think You Can Dance session at 3pm and 6pm.

Contestants will have the choice between two to three songs to perform their best dance moves, concentrating both on creativity and movement. Judging will be based on number of steps taken within the allotted time, as well as audience preference.

More Things to do at Power Smart Village: Tour an energy-efficient Home of the Future, or join the cheering as Games events are broadcast live on a 65-inch energy-efficient TV. Get creative with their digital Expression Wall. Create electricity – literally – on their sustainable dance floor.

AT 333 Dunsmuir Street, Downtown Vancouver

Green Blog Network Green Blog Network * Greening Hollywood * Greening Vancouver

Continue reading

4 Comments

Filed under 2010 Olympics, BC Clean Energy, Carbon Neutral, Green Blog Network, Green Cities, Green House Gas Emissions, Greening Hollywood, Greening Vancouver